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. >> ban ki moon has arrived in cairo in support of the cease- fire between israel and hamas. >> the exiled leader of hamas says they must take the first up a bit want the truce in israel. they will consider a cease-fire in israel and their attacks and the siege of gaza. >> israel has bombed building and at least 90 people have been killed and some 700 wounded since the air strikes began. >> the bombardment of gaza continues. israeli defense forces are picking targets they say it are connected to palestinian militants. the billionaire also among the latest casualties. across the border in israel, ground troops are massing in preparations for a possible invasion. israel has no mobilize and 40,000 reservists. elsewhere, diplomats are attempting to broker a ceasefire. in jerusalem, middle east peace envoy tony blair met with perez to stop the rocket attacks. >> it is clear we do not have any ambition to gain an advantage but we just want to stop the fire. >> more than 1000 rockets have been fired from a hamas- controlled gaza into israel. the defense system has stopped most of the rockets and
. their existence. >> we will be going live to cairo later in the show to check out the egyptian reaction to the crisis ongoing at the moment. meanwhile, angela merkel has been on a visit to moscow where she has been outspoken about human rights in russia. "she has been traveling with a business contingent of her trip has not just been about the euro. the ruble. >> they passed a resolution that underscored fears about the kremlin's commitment. >> vladimir putin as an less than happy to hear the criticism. clutched kendel merkel was expecting a chilly reception and. >> at a joint conference with business leaders, questions from the audience quickly turned to what many here see as an increasingly critical tone that germany and europe are taking with russia. >> she was surprisingly candid in her assessment. >> she said, we are concerned and it is my view as well that the kremlin has adopted a series of laws that do not do anything to promote principles such as the right of political groups to organize freely. she highlighted the two-year prison sentence given to members of the rock band puss
for americans inside he egypt and our embassy in cairo vazing them to avoid large clouds there and the embassy reporting protesters are pelting nearby police guarding with molotov cocktails and all of this is a backlash against morsi escalating reports tonight of one person killed and another injured on attacks on muslim brotherhood north of cairo and the muslim brotherhood morsi's political party and angered many opposition activist was a power grab, and giving himself near absolute control of egypt. steve harrigan is streaming live for us from cairo. he understands you're in tahrir square? >> reporter: harris, that square behind me, as you can see from our live pictures, more tents have sprung up as the evening has gone on and those protesters say they are there to say we're hearing some small explosions and tear gas after three nights of protests here, skirmishes, and at least 500 people injured in those protests and now a death tonight as well. this coming north of cairo when an office of the muslim brotherhood, the group that supports the president was attacked, one 15-year-old boy killed
's apparently wrapped up talk in cairo with president morsi, who this time yesterday was saying a truce, at least a cease-fire of some sorts, was just hours, hours away. let's go to tel aviv. sara sidner is standing by. tell our viewers what happened just a few hours ago. >> reporter: around noon, tel aviv time, there was an explosion on the number 61 bus. it was very close to the military headquarters here, very close to the courts here, along a street that was eventually block off by police. at least 22 people were injured, some of those people were on the bus, some outside the bus. they suffered everything from panic attacks to a couple teenagers who have the worst of the injuries. we talked to the e.r. doctor who told us one of the teenagers may lose a limb, perhaps an arm because of the soft tissue that's been blasted away. also a lot of shrapnel wounds in the face. both may face a lifetime of disability. those are his words. we talked to the police, more still looking for a suspect, trying to find out who was responsible. we saw the bus before testify driven away. all the windows
happened about 70 miles outside of cairo. one of the regional offices. one person killed in the attack, 60 wounded. here in cairo security forces skirmishes continues you can hear sirens and ambulances as well as tear gas is popped off as several thousand protestors are demonstrating to show their unhappiness. >> gregg: will morsi plan on meeting the judges tomorrow and what will they be talking about? >> as you know the judges across the country have threatened to go out on strike over this power grab by the egyptian president. there has been a meeting scheduled for tomorrow between morrisi and the judges no word of a cancellation. it could be an attempt by the egyptian president to reach out to opponents trying to draw black from the violence that has escalated. what we are waiting for as far as the demonstrations, when pro and anti-people on the ground will try and march. we'll get a gauge of their numbers to see how strong they are. right now opposition figures say they will be no dialogue with the egyptian president until he revokes the decree. >> gregg: give us a sense of the number
's in cairo and meeting with the egyptian president mohammed morsi who has emerged as a key player in the effort to try to end the fighting between israel and hamas. but mr. morsi walking a very tight political and social, for that matter, tight rope. reza sayah joining us from cairo. reza, morsi playing a pivot on the role, as egypt has in the past, in these talks. balancing the expectations of his street, the people that elected him and the muslim brotherhood, as well as the u.s. and the international community and all that is bound into that. >> yeah. michael, in many ways as we speak today egyptian president mohammed morsi is viewed as maybe the most important voice for the palestinians on the world stage, and to understand the type of pressure he is under it's so important to understand how arabs, how egyptians view this conflict between the palestinians and the israelis because it is very different from the western view. egyptians, arabs, look at the latest round of fighting, and they see more than 130 palestinians killed compared to five israelis killed. they should taking o
is in cairo where she met with president mohamed morsi of egypt who's mediating the discussions. as secretary clinton carries the official white house message there is new attention being paid to the president's strategic options in the region. "the washington post" writes president obama's decision to send his top diplomat on an emergency middle east peace making mission tuesday marked an administration shift to a more active vist role in the region's affairs and offered clues to how he may use the political elbow room afforded by a second term. beyond a cease-fire agreement, the president could try to throw his political clout behind a larger, long-term solution here. so far, no deal has materialized between israel and gaza. also, a bus bombing in tel aviv could push both sides further apart. 19 people were injured, three critically, in what was the first terror attack in israel in four years. police say, however, the incident was not a suicide bombing. joining me now, former assistant secretary of state, p.j. crowley and from tel aviv, nbc news correspondent stephanie gosk. thank you, both
with palestinian authority leaders and going to cairo to meet with mohamed morsi. i wouldn't be surprised based on what i'm hearing if there is no deal yet, she might come back to jerusalem, engage in some shuttle diplomacy, akin to henry kissinger. if israel moves into gaza with massive amounts of grounds forces, tanks, heavy artillery, armored personnel carriers, it will be a disaster. you know this area, you're there. you know how densely populated it is. it's going to be a serious problem and what the u.s. and egyptians, most of the international community, they want make sure israelis don't do it. but prime minister benjamin netanyahu say to keep the rockets and missiles come there coming in, they might have to do it. >> the death toll now in gaza, palestinian officials say is 137 people killed so far in the seven, now eight days going into the conflict. official death toll for israel is five. one soldier was killed today, first soldier killed by a rocket fires from gaza. joined by arwa damon and been ben wedeman. the blasts bring home the difficulties so many civilians face. people don't
. [ gunfire ] secretary of state hillary clinton and egypt's foreign minister announced the deal in cairo after the secretary spent the day in intense face-to-face talks with the leaders of israel, the palestinian authority and egypt. >> this is a critical moment for the region. egypt's new government is assuming the responsibility and leadership it has long made this country a cornerstone of regional stability and peace. >> we're still learning details of the agreement between the israelis and hamas. egypt and the united states apparently have assumed important major roles in keeping the peace and preventing new supplies of rockets from being smuggled into gaza. president obama spoke by phone today with the leaders of both egypt and israel. >> translator: i have agreed with the president that israel and the united states would work together to prevent the smuggling of arms to the terror organizations. the vast majority of which comes from iran. >> throughout this crisis cnn has positioned crews throughout the region including correspondents in egypt and on both sides of the israeli/gaza
, then go to israel, to cairo, to meet with mohammed morsi. what are you hearing about what's come out of her talks with netanyahu? >> well, they met for about two hours, and it wasn't just with the prime minister, but the defense minister of israel, the foreign minister, the national security team. they spent two hours going over what's going on. the statement released by the state department says she was briefed on the israeli position on all these issues. she's making it clear she wants to see a deescalation of what's going on. she uses the word a calm. they are avoiding the word cease-fire for right now but throughout the day, as you know, there was speculation coming from hamas and egyptian officials that they were close to a cease-fire agreement. the israelis downplaying that possibility, saying they weren't there until they actually had an agreement. there's no agreement and if anything, it looks like there was an intensification of the shelling in southern israel today by hamas and an intensification of israeli attacks in gaza witnessed by what happened to you guys, what you sa
is good. my money. my choice. my meineke. >>> cairo to istanbul, anger erupting over the latest conflict involving israel and hamas. these pictures come to us from indonesia, more than 5,000 people march through the streets of jakarta sunday, protesting israeli air strikes. the crowd marched to the u.s. embassy carrying flag and posters condemning israel. let's turn to egypt and a narrow strip of land that borders gaza. the rafa border, that's the crossing, this is gaza's only gateway to an arab ally. let's turn from this map to what is happening on the ground. the rafah crossing has become a dangerous place to be. it is a major crossing point for protesters and for those who are trying to smuggle weapons and supplies into gaza. israel says it is bombing smuggling tunnels that run under rafah. the border crossing is clogged with anti-israel protesters, trying to gain access to gaza. reza sayah reports. >> reporter: this is where egypt's border meets gaza. gaza is a small piece of land, about twice the size of washington, d.c. it has four gateways, three of them are inside israel. they're
tear gassed protesters in cairo's tahrir square. angry demonstrators packed the square today denouncing egyptian president mohamed morsi as a dictator and accusing him of a power grab. cnn's reza sayah is in cairo. reza, what's it look like now? >> reporter: joe, it is 11:00 p.m. cairo time. these demonstrators started gathering around in tahrir square about 1:00 p.m. local time. that means they've been going strong for about ten hours. many thought maybe egyptians were worn out, tired of demonstrating after the 2011 revolution, but if you look at tahrir square today, if you look at cairo today, it doesn't seem like it. the demonstrations are continuing. so are clashes. about an hour and a half ago clashes taking place right where we are behind us at the hotel we're staying at. security forces clashing with protesters. a number of protesters ambushed a police vehicle carrying riot police. the police took off. the protesters got ahold of this truck, set it on fire. more security forces came in, shot tear gas and disbursed the protesters. we've seen similar clashes throughout the day. all
in the west bank the right now she is in cairo meeting with egypt's president. mor morrissey is trying to broker a and when it happens we'll bring it to you live. wolf, i just wanted to ask about this bus attack in tel aviv. how large of a shadow does it cast? >> it's a very big shadow, the first time in at least i'm guessing six years that tel aviv has seen a terrorist incident like this. not that far away from the real commercial hub of the city. regular bus and about 20 people were injured. apparently a terrorist threw a bomb or whatever on the bus and escaped. the israelis did arrest someone later, but it proved to be a false arrest and they let that person go. there is someone on the loose right now who committed this. there are various groups claiming responsibility, though authoritatively no one has yet claimed responsibility. hamas did claim the incident, celebrated it, but didn't claim responsibility for it. one terrorist group claimed responsibility, but it's unclear from analysts if that's just a group trying to claim credibility that they had no involvement in. whatever it
and saying that a ceasefire will be announced in cairo this evening. israeli radio reporting that the ceasefire could be declared during secretary clinton's visit to jerusalem. she left from southeast asia where she has been traveling with the president. her diplomatic mission is the most direct engagement yet in these negotiations. >> her visits will build on the engagement that we've undertaken over the last several days including the engagement by president obama and secretary clinton with leaders in the region and to support a de-escalation of the violence. >> president obama himself was on the phone in the early hours of the morning trying to prevent the conflict from escalating into a ground war. explosions and smoke clouds dotted the skyline in gaza again as soon as the sun was up. more than 100 people are now confirmed dead there with dozens of children among those killed. more rockets from gaza landing in southern israel today. one sent flying in the direction of jerusalem. israeli police said more than 60 rockets were fired by midday. thousands of israeli reservists
of the possibility of a cease-fire. hamas officials say, in fact, it would have been announced hours ago in cairo. clearly, that's not happening. there's no sign of a cease-fire. in fact, certainly, if you look -- if we go back over the last few hours, five or six hours, it's been an evening of fairly intense fire, not only incoming israeli air strikes, but just a little while ago, we saw two rockets being launched also from this area behind me. and certainly by the looks of those rockets, and we're getting very good at recognizing them, some of them do appear to be these so-called 5 rockets, which have a fairly long range, rockets fired in the direction of tel aviv and jerusalem. also today, one of those rockets falling to the south near the settlement block in the west bank. and another building, an israeli building a town outside tel aviv on the road to jerusalem. so we've seen a fairly intense evening, certainly, of violence here, incoming, as well as outgoing. and all this talk about a ceasefire and discussions in cairo and elsewhere don't seem to be amounting to much at this time. now, toda
. a fox urgent, explosions in cairo's tahrir square according to our reporter on the ground as a crowd which he described as similar in size to the gathering during the arab spring. protesting against the islamist president and the muslim brotherhood. 200,000 egyptians are estimated to pack the streets in the growing outrage over the president morsi's takeover. last week, the president from the muslim brotherhood issued several decrees including an order that every decision he makes is a final decision, no review. critics say he appointed himself as a dictator two years after a massive popular uprising ousted mubarak. our eyes and ears on the ground, these are the latest crowds you have seen in tahrir square, right, steve? >> the five days since the decree we wondered if the protests would get bigger or smaller. they are growing larger and more angry. the crowd today well over 100,000 people in tahrir square, and from different walks of life, different political stories. the opposition to the president has been unified by his decree expanding his own power. so we have people on want th
. ♪ nothing beats a family. >> a fox news alert and some explosives new fallout on the streets of cairo as thousands of egyptians stage angry demonstrations over a power grab by the country's recently elected president. i'm rick folbalm. >> heather: and i'm heather childers. accusing morsi of an unprecedented attack on the judiciary. and this is after last year's revolution and they continued to stage rallies across the country, sparking new fears on the instability in an already volatile part of the world. steve harrigan is streaming live for us from cairo, egypt. steve? >> heather, there's a showdown between egypt' new president, morsi and the chief judges throughout the country say they will not go back to work as long as the president's orders stand, basically putting anything he says, any decree he makes, above the law and not subject to the court and we could have a country where prosecution basically shuts down. as far as the protesters in cairo, they've set up tents on tahrir down from yesterday, 40,000, yesterday afternoon and it turned violent and other cities, xaalexandria an
cambodia, first to jerusalem, then to the west bank, back to jerusalem and then cairo, in a frantic search for a cease-fire. all day, a truce seemed to be negotiated by israeli bombardment by sea and air and hamas rockets. prospects seemed bleak until the sudden announcement. >> the united states welcomes the agreement today for a cease-fire in gaza. for it to hold, the rocket attacks must end, a broader calm returned. >> reporter: the gunfire in gaza turned to bursts of celebration. but in jerusalem, israel's leaders briefed the nation on the deal grim faced. a deal which seemed beyond reach this morning. the first bus bombing in israel since 2006, in the heart of tel aviv, across the street from the defense ministry. we found the bus cleaved open. and anger. this eyewitness told me he thought it was a rocket, saying that israel can't go on like this, that it must invade gaza. more than 20 wounded by what police say was an ied and the suspect, still at large. even with the cease-fire, the guns weren't silenced. as many as 20 rockets fired out of gaza, hours after the deal was inked. now,
prime minister benjamin netanyahu before jetting to cairo for talks with the president of egypt, mohammad morsi. the urgency underscored by the carnage in benghazi. rockets are lobbying back and forth. israeli air attacks killing 27 more palestinians bringing the death toll to 137 just in the last week. >> now a spokesman for hamas sounded cautiously optimistic that a cease-fire could be at hand telling cnn we are close, we are on the edge. cnn has reporters blanketing the region to bring you the most comprehensive coverage of this crisis in gaza. fred pleitgen is in ashkelon, ben wedemans in gaza city. ben wedeman, good morning, set the scene for me. >> reporter: yes, brooke, it was a noisezy night and we saw intense bombardment just behind where i'm standing. that was proceeded by increasing sort of mounting reports that a cease-fire was about to be announced or a period of calm. but it appears that there were problems within the israeli government that prime minister benjamin netanyahu and his foreign minister lieberman didn't see eye to eye with the defense minister who was
to deescalate the situation in gaza. >> rose: the secretary of state travels to cairo tomorrow to take part in further negotiations, joining me now is rashid khalidi, he is the edward site professor of modern arab studies in columbia university, in washington dennis ross is with the washington institute for near east policy and a former u.s. envoy to the middle east. >> and abrams on the council for foreign relations a deputy national security advisor for global democracy strategy for president bush. his book tested by zion comes out later this year and i am pleased to have all of them here on this program this evening. i begin with dennis ross, tell me where you think we are at this moment, dennis. >> well, i do think the outline of the cease-fire are probably getting pretty close to being finalized, i don't think they are quite finalized yet, not because the outlines are unclear but because i think there is probably a desire to have the secretary of state make certain that the understandings are understood the same way by all of the parties, number one, number 2, that there are actually p
, but they have a relationship with the egyptians. there have been israeli envoys that have gone to cairo to meet with high-ranking egyptian officials. trying to broker a deal. no trust, hamas has to trust for the israelis and israelis have no trust for the hamas. there have been a lot of rockets and missiles coming from gaza into israeli and the israeli air strikes pounded away at targets in garz. a lot of casualties. there's no goodwill on the part of either of these, they don't trust each other. having said that, looks like they're close. hamas seems to think within the next hour or two some agreement will be announced, thanks to the egyptians. but i spoke with the israeli government spokesman for the israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu in the past hour, he said there's no deal yet. he didn't rule out there wouldn't be a deal but he said there's no deal yet. until all of the is are dotted, t richardson cros are crossed. until there's a deal, there's no deal, as they like to say, the diplomatic community. >> we also know the president, president obama, has called and talked to the preside
senior hamas official who said that at 9:00 p.m. cairo time, 10:00 p.m. eastern standard time, that there would be an announcement in cairo, by an official, from the egyptian government and from hamas, announcing some sort of agreement for at least a temporary cease-fire. however, we're hearing from other hamas officials that israel has yet to agree to this proposed cease-fire and the israelis are saying there is nothing as of yet. but the idea is rather than send out broad guidelines for a period of peace and calm, they just want to see if both sides can keep the peace. now, one of the concerns here is that it is not just hamas who is operating in gaza, there are other groups like islamic jihad, affiliated with iran, even smaller splinter groups out there that hamas doesn't necessarily control completely. and therefore that's why they want to give this -- this initial period to see if the peace can indeed or quiet or calm can hold. >> ben, in terms of the entire region, and we're standing sort of by a map which i want to show our viewers, this and is of israel, you've got the
turn violent here in cairo and other cities. buildings torched. police cars torched. a lot of tear gas and pepper spray in the shutdowns between protestors and security forces. and morsi and the top justices. many chief justices here in cairo and across the country they will no longer to go work until the president repeals his decrease for a power grab. we're seen what could be a show down on the streets. that is when supporters on tuesday and saying that he is trying to be a dictator will face off. both opponents and supporters of the president hauling out people and major marches expected on tuesday. >> heather: steve, thank you. >> gregg: contest in the background on egypt's president morsi. he was elected in june of this year after a revolution overthrowing president hosni mubarak. he is head 6 muslim brotherhood. he is the first freely elected president and first islamist to be head of an arab state. they accuse him of trying to monopolize powers, the courts and media and parliament and in the end, sharia law, imposing strict islamic principles. >> heather: it raises new questions
are the greatest defender of the arab cause, which is the palestinian cause. and it works. go to cairo, to the shops of cairo, and you will see photographs of ahmadinejad, an iranian leader. why? because he stands up for the palestinians. that's the game the iranians play, and my guess is the more horrible the pictures are out of gaza the more there is a sense of this massive drift of power between israel and the palestinians. the more iran will be seen as one of the few countries that is willing to really stand up and speak against the west and, you know, they have, as you know, very colorful rhetoric, but that's all geared towards this regional gain where they're almost outwitting the arab against the palestinians. >> let me veer off to israel for a moment. benjamin netanyahu is up for reelection soon. how much do you think what's happening now, this rousing with gaza, does or doesn't have anything to do with him? >> we have to hope this has nothing to do with that because this is a very serious business. not only is he taking his own country into a military operation, he is risking
forced from power from popular revolt. joining me is reza. in cairo. and we also have a senior fellow here in new york. the egyptian prime minister met with hamas today and he classified hamas as a terrorist organization. should washington be concerned about israel's role in the conflict. >> reporter: anderson, it's impossible to say what egypt's role is at this point. it is not clear at this point if the fiery rhetoric is just rhetoric or if there's something beyond that or prepare for example more drastic measures. i think we'll find out in the days and weeks to come, but people in washington are listening to this explosive rhetoric and they are concerned, but if you look carefully there's not much happening beyond the rhetoric. i don't think egypt can describe this and viewed as extreme, belligerent departure from the past and they certainly haven't taken arms against israel will and providing material support to hamas and they've come out and said loud and clear that we're going to abide by the camp david accords, the peace accords between camp david and israel and these are all e
of the palestinians in gaza. tens of thousands of demonstrators filled the streets of cairo to show their support for the palestinians. egypt's relations with hamas strengthened. but the new administration in that country. protesters in turkey set an israeli flag and photo of benjamin netanyahu ablaze during a demonstration last night. let's go now to the israeli side of the border as we've been reporting israeli tanks and troops have been taking up position there's. cnn's reporter joins us live from the border. fred, thanks for joining us. what you are seeing in the terms of military activity where you are? >> reporter: hi, gary. there is a lot of military activity on this side of the border as well. a lot of it has to do with the big military buildup that's going on here. look at the roads around the area of gaza, a lot of them have been blocked off. they're not accessible anymore to normal people that want go to go through there they're a military operation zone. you're seeing a lot of military hardware on the road, usually on the back of trucks. we see a lot of tanks being delivered here, a l
. secretary clinton goes on to cairo tomorrow. cairo, egypt. stay in the middle east where relentless airstrikes and rockets continue to rain down despite talk of a cease-fire. to david lee miller in israel with the latest. >> stewart, it was a late night for diplomacy. the israeli prime minister netanyahu meeting with secretary of state hillary clinton. no announcement regarding a cease-fire. they both addressed the fact that whatever is produced has to be a lasting and just peace. meanwhile, hamas spokesman says israel has not responded to the latest cease-fire proposals and the earliest there could be any type of truce is tomorrow. meanwhile, we have seen today more rockets launched from gaza by militants. at least 130 of them -- one of the rockets landing not far from the city of jaw jerusalem. it landed in a palestinian village. also another rocket hit a building on the outskirts of tel aviv. this was the farthest rocket hit yet since this conflict got underway. it traveled some 45 miles and there were some light injuries in the tel aviv area. throughout the south, a steady garag
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into the central square in cairo to call for an end to the new egyptian leader's regime. it was an enormous show of strength from the opposition that spent days blasting egypt he is new president, morsi. he upset just about everybody last week when he decided to give himself broad new powers that say his decisions don't need approval from any court. essentially he's above the law. really no different than a dictator. protests showed their across the country, some of them violent. street fighting this between demonstrators and police. president morsi tried to calm the criticism by promising to reserve his new powers for only the most important decisions. but that didn't appease the protesters. remember, just last week, the united states was publicly praising president morsi when he helped end the conflict between israel and gaza. the white house says president obama has not spoken to his egyptian counterpart since then and today the press secretary jay carney said basically the egyptians need to work this out themselves. there is no evidence that will happen any time soon. right now this enormous
" in order to promote stability. steve harrigan is live in cairo. what is the draft constitution? >>reporter: well, opposition figures including the nobel peace prize laureate is calling the constitution a coup against democracy. they are sharply criticizing it as a rush drive, 16 hours of voting on a constitution, pushing it through only after all moderates, liberals and christians have left the room in protest. right now it stands to go to referendum in 15 days but the anger against it and the concerns about the protection of women under the new constitution, the role of islam under the new constitution, that has raised the number of protesters we are seeing tonight. >>shepard: and nothing has lessened the numbers. >>reporter: it was an intent to try and stem the profit but the reverse is happening with larger and stronger crowds than last night. some of the opposition leaders say they vow to sleep in this square until the president backs down. the president has supporters and we are likely to see the muslim brotherhood to come out to support the president. >>shepard: thank you, steve harr
in this process. i will carry this message to cairo tomorrow. i will also be consulting with president abas in ramala. let me also say to echo the prime minister, i'm very pleased that the iron dome defense system is performing so well. our partnership in support of this system represents america's enduring commitment to the safety and security of the israeli people and to israel's right to defend itself. but no defense is perfect. and our hearts break for the loss of every civilian israeli and palestinian and for all those who have been wounded or who are living in fear and danger. i know today was a difficult day. and i offer my deepest condolences to the loved ones of those who were lost and injured. in the end there is no substitute for security and for a just and lasting peace. and the current crisis certainly focuses us on the urgency of this broader goal. so in the days ahead the united states will work with our partners here in israel and across the region toward an outcome that bolsters security for the people of israel, improves conditions for the people of gaza and moves toward a
with any envoys. he will be heading back to cairo tomorrow to meet with hillary clinton. egyptian officials involved or familiar with them have been telling nbc news this is unlikely to be a long-term truce. this is more likely to be a cessation of hostilities in the short term to pave the way for longer discussions about the fundamental issues as to why this persistent problem keeps coming up, the siege on gaza, rockets into southern israel and outstanding issues. what we can say so far is that all indications suggest that there will be a truce at some point. palestinian factions here say they are open to it. they say nothing has been signed. they don't mind having a short-term truce. so long as egypt will guarantee the fundamental issues of the bigger problems of gaza are addressed and not kicked down the road. i think that's something that martin suggested. there are a lot of fund mental issues that need to be resolved. no indication all of those have been addressed in the short-term cessation of hostilities which egyptian officials say is within their reach, although nothing yet officia
to cairo where she's meeting with the egyptian president mursi. mrs. clinton making it clear that she is not interested in a quick fix in gaza. >> the goal must be a durable outcome that promotes regional stability, and advances the security and legitimate aspirations of israelis and palestinians alike. >> cnn reporters flanking the middle east today to bring you the most comprehensive coverage of the crisis in gaza and in jerusalem and in israel. ben wedeman is in gaza city. frederick pleitgen is in ashkelon city. we begin with sara sidner at the scene of that bus explosion that happened just a little while ago in tel aviv. sara first of all describe for me how that looks right now. >> what has happened right now is the cleanup is under way. there are still tape up around the scene. we're very close to the defense department building, and the military headquarters, this is a bus that the number 61 bus, we know that it exploded, glass all around the bus was blown out. however the blast was not strong enough to knock out the ability for the bus to operate. and so we saw literally the b
. >> nbc's stephanie gosk is in tel aviv, ayman mohyeldin in gaza, jim maceda in cairo. let's ask jim maceda, you were in cairo the announcement came from there. egypt is being given credit for having at least brokered this deal or godfathered this deal. what are the terms? do we know anything more about the terms of the cease-fire? >> well, we know that there was no formal agreement. that's the key thing here. this means that israel and hamas had reached an understanding, a kind of exchange of quiet for quiet, and that this will be the first phase of a deal. that will be followed by a second phase in days or weeks or months of much more intense negotiations. those talks will be anchored by and guaranteed by egypt, but with the strong participation of the united states to resolve key demands on both sides which are still out there. the main demand from hamas who wants the block aid of gaza lifted immediately, that is not going to happen, the israelis want an immediate end to all smuggling of arms and to gaza and the sinai, that has not happened either. they have agreed to these demand
brown. on the "newshour" tonight: we have reports from tel aviv, gaza, and cairo. and ray suarez examines the prospects ahead for the peace deal. >> woodruff: then, margaret warner reports from turkey where the syrian civil war is having an impact along the shared 500 mile border and in ankara. >> with fighting in syrian areas, spilling over into turkish towns, turkey finds itself walking a fine line between defending its interests, and being drawn into a regional war. >> brown: after the deluge: we assess the impact of all the money spent in the most expensive campaign in history. >> woodruff: as recovery costs from superstorm sandy continue to rise, paul solman looks at weather risks and the business of insurance. >> all insurance companies are paying very careful attention to the variability and the volatility in the climate. >> brown: and poet joy harjo celebrates the focal point of families and thanksgiving: the kitchen table. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 ye
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